Mystery Quilt Revealed

A week or so ago I posted some random quilt pieces I’d come across, curious if anyone recognized them.  Then a few days later someone gave mom some quilt books she was getting rid of and as I flipped through one of them I was delighted to recognize that curve.

Unknown Quilt Pieces on Jan Made It

Turns out I was trying to make something round, when the actual pattern is square. The curves go to the middle. I rough-cut the pieces and just scooched them into place so I could show what it’s supposed to look like.

Hands all around

And you can tell by the “hands” at each of the four corners, it utilizes the diamond shape too.

Unknown Quilt Pieces on Jan Made It

It’s called Hands All Around and here is a pretty red and white one and a vintage scrappy one.  Here’s another one with the blocks assembled on the diagonal with a vintage lady featured in the center. Here’s a pretty blue and white one.

This is one of the quilt blocks that’s used for Friendship Quilts. These quilts include a blank space for individuals to sign their names or record other information that’s then embroidered permanently on the block. They are also called Signature Quilts or Autograph Quilts.

The googling I did for Hands All Around didn’t turn up anyone who had made one recently and I saw comments that weren’t really excited about the curved lines in the block. Several of the quilt tops I saw had been hand-pieced.

I’ve already figured out a way to eliminate the corners, by making more triangles, it’s a technique I’ve seen on Fons and Porter and Eleanor Burns. But I don’t think there’s a way around the curves. I’ll just have to stitch slow.

I’ll make one Hands All Around block in the red, white and blue just to say I did.  Then  we’ll see if I want to make more or if it just becomes a pillow or maybe a tote bag. With just a few I could make a table runner or some placemats for the 4th of July.

What do you think? Would you color match it, or make it scrappy?

Crocheted Nested Baskets

Here are a couple of small baskets I crocheted recently.

Crcocheted Baskets on JanMadeIt

I work at JoAnn’s Fabric and Crafts and when our crochet and knitting teacher abruptly left we had students signed up for the beginning How-to class and I was drafted. I am by no means an expert, but I can teach you how to do it and then we can go from there.

I’ll be teaching these baskets on Tuesday. It’s a simple project, and I made the small basket in just a little over an hour.

Crocheted Baskets on JanMadeIt

The instructions (provided by JoAnn’s) call for a chunky yarn with a hook smaller than suggested for this yarn. The construction is very easy. After you get the base the size you want, crochet the next row in the back loop, then continue as usual until the basket is as tall as you want it. That back loop stitch is all it takes to make the turn and create the sides of the basket. If you’re new to this technique, I’d advise starting with a lighter yarn. It was hard to find the back loop on some stitches in this dark yarn.

The larger basket is about four inches tall and a little bit wider.  The smaller basket nests neatly inside.  It’s about three inches across.

One other suggestion for basket making.  Stitch markers.

If I don’t use them I make a basket that’s wider at the top than the bottom. When I put a stitch marker at the beginning of the row I was able to keep the sides straight.

Crocheted Baskets 3

That’s all there is to it. We’ll see how things go in class on Tuesday. I have some tan chunky yarn that will match these that I’ll use for my project in class. The class is three hours long, and we should be able to finish at least one basket.

There’s so much you can do with a crocheted basket when you get the technique down. It can be a basket, a pet bed, add a handle and it’s a bag, line it and make a little trash bag for the car… what else?

Anybody have other suggestions for crocheted basket making that I haven’t come up with yet? And what do you want to use it for?

Jan

 

Fabric Flowers

If you know me in person you know I frequently wear a flower pin on a plain t-shirt. It started a few years ago when I got a brand new bright yellow shirt that fit perfectly and was the perfect shade of yellow.

After I wore if a few times I noticed a tiny pinprick hole near the neckline binding on the left side. Arrgggghh! But I was determined to continue wearing it and I came across a scrap, a very small scrap of vintage yellow fabric with strawberries on it. After I mulled it over awhile I gathered it into a circle, topped it with some red, and found some vintage buttons to layer on the top.
Vintage Fabric Flower on JanMadeIt

Now that I describe the process, I really should take it apart and feature the vintage fabric that inspired me.

But a new hobby was born (like I needed another). Here’s how I used another very small scrap of vintage fabric. I stitched this one into little pleats to form the circle.

Vintage Black and Bright Fabric Flower on JanMadeIt

The fabric had a looser weave, so I added a little blanket stitch to keep it from fraying too much. I don’t think the buttons are vintage, but they were the right size and color.

Since my wardrobe is primarily jeans and a t-shirt, I went a little nuts making these fabric flowers the last few years. This morning I took pictures of just the ones that are handy and ended up with over forty images.

I get lots of comments and questions about how I make them. I’ll just pick up a scrap, and grab a needle and thread and start doing something with it. I’m halfway done by the time I think to take a picture to show how I do it.

I wear them on a pin back, but they can easily be applied to a hair clip, a headband, ponytail holder, a hat… anywhere you want some embellishment.

This one is trimmed with baby rick rack, and centered with a scrap of lace and vintage buttons. Vintage Buttons and Lace on JanMadeIt

I made several with this same black and ivory calico.  Here’s another vintage button and some lace. I think this one went through the wash with the shirt I wore it on. The frayed edges are a little wrinkled.

Calico, vintage button and lace on JanMadeIt

Here I continued with the lace and twisted the black calico and a strip of ivory into this rosette. Looks like I need to clip some stray threads off this one.

Black and Ivory Calico Rosette on JanMadeItI think you get the idea. There are literally dozens more where these came from. I’ll try to share more of them in the coming weeks.

Anyone else out there make flowers?  Mine are all ad lib, but there are some really nice specific patterns and techniques I’d like to try. Let me know what you think.

Jan

What is this curved piece used for?

My mom participates in activities at the senior citizen’s center and it’s not unusual for some of the folks to bring in random things to share when they move or downsize. Lots of books, art supplies, plant cuttings, and fabrics make their way to the table out front. Not long ago mom brought home a stash of quilting leftovers. In amongst the scraps she found some already cut quilt pieces.

And there’s one we can’t figure out.

Unknown Quilt Pieces on Jan Made It

She’s already made two quilts (that I know of) from rescued already-cut quilt pieces. This blue and pink is twin sized. The solid blue and floral print rectangles were rescued and she pulled the pink out of her stash for the border.

Rescue Quilt Blue and Pink

This print fabric is from the 70s or 80s and coincidentally it’s a fabric she’d used before. She tracked down her own scraps to cut an extra piece or two. I think I suggested the saw tooth edge. It’s one of my favorite borders, but there wasn’t enough to go all the way around so it’s just on the sides.

More recently she took a pile of squares we found and came up with this.

Rescue Quilt on Jan Made It
These fabrics are more recent, maybe ten years ago?, and I had some of this collection in my stash. It’s a double size quilt.

But back to this recent find. There were stacks and stacks of diamonds in a variety of calicoes. And there was a smaller batch of a curved piece.

Unknown Quilt Pieces on Jan Made It

Now there are lots of things to do with a pile of diamonds: make stars, stitch them end to end into rows, assemble a V pattern make rows of chevron; but we’re having a hard time with the curved piece. We tried to fit the curved piece and the diamond together, but the angles and edges don’t fit together.

Any idea what quilt pattern this piece makes? Does it go together to make a circle? Or maybe every other one flips and makes a snake-like row? Is it all pieced together to make a block, or is it stitched to a block like an applique?

Unknown Quilt Pieces on Jan Made It

I’m sure Mom will come up with something great once she wraps her head around these curves. I’m the one who wants to know what it was cut for.  I haven’t found an index of quilt pieces and what they’re used for, but surely there’s a quilter out there who can help.

Any ideas? And what would you make out of it

Jan

A Springtime Garden Wreath

It’s taken me a few weeks to stitch up a pile of flowers, but here they are.  All bright and cheery on the front door.

Spring Wreath on JanMadeIt.wordpress.com

There are roses, and daisies, and all sorts of generic ruffledy flowers, along with a collection of generic leaves in a variety of greens.

I covered a Styrofoam wreath with dark green felt, just using straight pins to hold it in place, and then used more pins to randomly attach the flowers. It was a little harder to be “random” than one would expect, but I think I managed to make the colors flow from one shade to the next in a pleasing way.

I took this picture at an angle to keep the fill flash from reflecting back at me and creating a hot spot on the glass. I just now noticed that angle exposed the green felt and the pins I used to assemble the wreath. Oops.  Guess I should have crocheted a few more leaves and flowers.

I found dozens of free patterns for crocheted flowers and leaves online and after I made a few of them I started winging it and making my own.

My plan is to go into more detail and about these flowers and provide links for the flowers I made, and directions on how I made the others. However, last night I made a list of the projects in progress just within sight of my bedside table and came up with 16 projects or parts of projects.

Today I checked off,

  • Finish Spring Wreath
  • Attach wire hanger to the back of the wreath
  • Hang wreath and photograph it
  • Post wreath online.

So I’ll do my best to keep my focus on these flowers for a few more days before I move onto the next thing.

By the way, this is the third wreath I’ve made this year with this same Styrofoam form and straight pins. I made one for Valentine’s Day and then took that apart and made another for St. Patrick’s Day.

Valentine's Wreath on JanMadeItSt. Patriock's Day Wreath on JanMadeItAfter I took the pictures, we added a few little stuffed hearts to hang inside the Valentine’s wreath. I used a collection of 4-inch squares intended for a pixelated heart quilt. These were spare parts for the little quilt that also needs to be on my list of things to finish.

The St. Pat’s wreath was wrapped with green tulle flocked with shamrocks. I paid $2 a yard on the clearance table at Joann’s. It was from the 2016 season. The green net with gold trim has been in my stash for years. I think it came from my grandmother. It was paired with matching gold trimmed red net in a box with Christmas decorations.  But the green was perfect for this wreath too.

Now the 4-inch squares are back in a box with my ready to assemble pixelated heart quilt; and the green tulle and trim is folded neatly in a gallon-size storage bag waiting for another project. As it gets closer to Memorial Day I’ll come up with a Patriotic sort of idea I can use through the 4th of July.

It’s so much trouble to make, or buy, and then store “regular” wreaths. I decided to use this same form all year. The parts are easily stored for another project or the same wreath next year.

So in a few months I’ll be looking for things that might need a crocheted flower or two. I’ll have plenty.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch

Here’s the green scarf I made using the Vintage Ripple Stitch pattern without the “V” design. This was super easy because I didn’t have to pay attention to turning the corner every three sets of stitches.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 6

I used apple flavored Red Heart Gum Drop yarn. It was marked down and the only skein in the bin so if it wasn’t enough, I might have ended up ripping it out, but it turned out to be just the right amount for a scarf.

In case you missed it here is the scarf where I found this stitch pattern. , and this afghan pattern was also helpful in figuring it out.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 7

I turned the first row after six sets of stitches and it ended up being about 5 1/2 inches wide, and 39 inches long. It’s not quite long enough to go around my neck twice as an infinity scarf, and not long enough to tie if I leave it flat. So I came up with Plan B.

Buttons.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch Scarf JanMadeIt

But I didn’t want to actually stitch the buttons to the scarf so I figured out another way to use them.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 2

I liked these huge turquoise buttons, but they were too big to use without adding a button loop. So, I attached a smaller yellow button on the back which will fit through holes in the pattern of the scarf. It’s kind of a toggle button and works like a cufflink.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 3

I used matching pearl cotton to stitch them together and slipped a crochet hook between them to leave space between the two buttons as I stitched them back to back.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 5

Now I can slip the yellow button through the scarf to make an infinity scarf. If I want it high around my neck I can wrap it twice and then button it into place. I can criss-cross it across my throat and button it together in any number of ways.

The smaller yellow buttons look just as good on the backside as the large buttons do on the front.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch Scarf on Jan Made It

I’ll track down a model and show you the variety of ways these two-sided toggle buttons will shape a scarf. I have a few other scarves that could have a whole new look with some toggle buttons. I’m on the prowl, especially in my own button stash, for other sets of buttons I could use on a variety of scarves.

Trouble is we’ve had a very mild winter here and my scarf-wearing days are about over for the season. But I’ll be ready when the next cold wind comes sweeping down the plains.  Which here in Oklahoma might be tomorrow or the next day.

Vintage Ripple Scarf

I bought some Sweet Roll yarn by Premier recently and made it into a Vintage Rippling Scarf.

Vintage Ripple Stitch on JanMadeIt.wordpress.com

It turned out to be pretty easy, as promised in the instructions, but it’s confusing when you’re figuring it out. I looked around and found a Vintage Ripple Stitch and between the two sets of instructions, I figured it out.

Each row is a series of six clusters with a change of direction halfway across. Each cluster is made of chains and double crochets. See, simple.

Vintage Ripple Scarf on JanMadeIt.wordpress.com

I used one skein of yarn and came up with a scarf about 60 inches long and five inches wide. Because of the V shape of the rows it made sense to connect the ends and make it an infinity scarf. It was a simple matter to fasten the final stitch and then weave in the ends by stitching the two ends together. The way the clusters turn at the end of each row creates a smooth edge along the sides.

Vintage Ripple Scarf on JanMadeIt.wordpress.com

I used Peaches and Cream Pop, a combination of peach, pink and cream colors. I’ve purchased about 10 skeins of Sweet Roll, all in different colors. The challenge is finding a pattern that will show off all three colors.

Vintage Ripple Scarf on JanMadeIt.wordpress.com

I found some chevron patterned afghans which used this stitch but if you search for ripple stitch, you’ll come up with a lot of wavy patterned afghans. I think it’s a generic description for a variety of stitches. I found a Vintage Rippling Block which seems to match this particular stitch.

What do you think? Anyone else used this stitch for anything? And how about the Sweet Roll Yarn.  How are you using these yummy colors?

Jan

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