Green Vintage Ripple Stitch

Here’s the green scarf I made using the Vintage Ripple Stitch pattern without the “V” design. This was super easy because I didn’t have to pay attention to turning the corner every three sets of stitches.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 6

I used apple flavored Red Heart Gum Drop yarn. It was marked down and the only skein in the bin so if it wasn’t enough, I might have ended up ripping it out, but it turned out to be just the right amount for a scarf.

In case you missed it here is the scarf where I found this stitch pattern. , and this afghan pattern was also helpful in figuring it out.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 7

I turned the first row after six sets of stitches and it ended up being about 5 1/2 inches wide, and 39 inches long. It’s not quite long enough to go around my neck twice as an infinity scarf, and not long enough to tie if I leave it flat. So I came up with Plan B.

Buttons.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch Scarf JanMadeIt

But I didn’t want to actually stitch the buttons to the scarf so I figured out another way to use them.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 2

I liked these huge turquoise buttons, but they were too big to use without adding a button loop. So, I attached a smaller yellow button on the back which will fit through holes in the pattern of the scarf. It’s kind of a toggle button and works like a cufflink.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 3

I used matching pearl cotton to stitch them together and slipped a crochet hook between them to leave space between the two buttons as I stitched them back to back.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch 5

Now I can slip the yellow button through the scarf to make an infinity scarf. If I want it high around my neck I can wrap it twice and then button it into place. I can criss-cross it across my throat and button it together in any number of ways.

The smaller yellow buttons look just as good on the backside as the large buttons do on the front.

Green Vintage Ripple Stitch Scarf on Jan Made It

I’ll track down a model and show you the variety of ways these two-sided toggle buttons will shape a scarf. I have a few other scarves that could have a whole new look with some toggle buttons. I’m on the prowl, especially in my own button stash, for other sets of buttons I could use on a variety of scarves.

Trouble is we’ve had a very mild winter here and my scarf-wearing days are about over for the season. But I’ll be ready when the next cold wind comes sweeping down the plains.  Which here in Oklahoma might be tomorrow or the next day.

Vintage Ripple Scarf

I bought some Sweet Roll yarn by Premier recently and made it into a Vintage Rippling Scarf.

Vintage Ripple Stitch on JanMadeIt.wordpress.com

It turned out to be pretty easy, as promised in the instructions, but it’s confusing when you’re figuring it out. I looked around and found a Vintage Ripple Stitch and between the two sets of instructions, I figured it out.

Each row is a series of six clusters with a change of direction halfway across. Each cluster is made of chains and double crochets. See, simple.

Vintage Ripple Scarf on JanMadeIt.wordpress.com

I used one skein of yarn and came up with a scarf about 60 inches long and five inches wide. Because of the V shape of the rows it made sense to connect the ends and make it an infinity scarf. It was a simple matter to fasten the final stitch and then weave in the ends by stitching the two ends together. The way the clusters turn at the end of each row creates a smooth edge along the sides.

Vintage Ripple Scarf on JanMadeIt.wordpress.com

I used Peaches and Cream Pop, a combination of peach, pink and cream colors. I’ve purchased about 10 skeins of Sweet Roll, all in different colors. The challenge is finding a pattern that will show off all three colors.

Vintage Ripple Scarf on JanMadeIt.wordpress.com

I found some chevron patterned afghans which used this stitch but if you search for ripple stitch, you’ll come up with a lot of wavy patterned afghans. I think it’s a generic description for a variety of stitches. I found a Vintage Rippling Block which seems to match this particular stitch.

What do you think? Anyone else used this stitch for anything? And how about the Sweet Roll Yarn.  How are you using these yummy colors?

Jan

Just Peachy Grannie Scarf

If you’re one of those who enjoys a nice warm wrap around the neck when the cold winds blow you might be interested in this crocheted winter scarf.

I made a batch of these brick-shaped grannie squares some time back intending to make an afghan. I never quite settled on how I wanted to put them together so they’ve been languishing in a plastic bin for awhile. Last week I decided to do something about it and put the two peachy shades together to come up with this cozy scarf.

If you like this you can grab it at MerryBelle’s on Main Street here in Norman. MerryBelle’s is at 230 East Main. As you drive east down Main street start looking for a parking spot on the south side of the street as soon as you pass Arvest Bank on the corner. MerryBelle’s is at the east end of the block.

I have more blocks in a couple of shades of teal, sunshine yellow and fire engine red. I’ll mix and match those into at least one more scarf.

I didn’t think to measure this before I dropped it off, but it’s about 10ish inches wide and with 6 blocks used it’s at least 60 inches long. Even though it has an open weave with the grannie stitch, it’s plenty warm. The width makes it scrunch up around your neck providing extra warmth.

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