Summer Sun Wreath

Here’s my August wreath.

If you don’t have a stash of fabric to dig through to make one of these, I’m so sorry to hear that. But you can go to the fabric store and buy what you need. You’ll need about two yards and a fat quarter of fabric, straight pins, a needle and thread, and a Styrofoam wreath form.

Pick out a collection of yellows, I used solid colors, but blenders and calicoes will work too. Buy widths of 1/8, 1/4 and 1/2 yard, to come up with a total of 1–1 1/2 yards of yellow. Get the most of your favorite, with other shades just to make it interesting. Find a half-yard of a contrasting print for the center, and select a fat quarter that goes with all of it for the sunspot.

Summer Sun Wreath on Jan Made It

First the Stars and Stripes wreath had to come apart. My nieces were at the house for a few hours one day last week and Riley took it apart for me and started this one by wrapping my handy-dandy Styrofoam ring in a strip of yellow fabric.

Summer Sun Wreath on Jan Made It

Then I ripped different shades of yellow fabric into strips about four inches wide, give or take. Some strips are about 45 inches long, the width of the fabric, and others, from scraps, are shorter.

If you bought fabric, use the 1/8 yard as is; rip the quarter-yard in half; and rip the half-yard three times to make four strips. You can cut some of these strips in half if you want shorter strips for more variety.

I hand-basted a loooong running stitch down the middle of each strip and pulled each into a ruffle. I pinned one end of the ruffle to the wreath and randomly gathered it and shaped it as I pinned it to the wreath.

I folded some strips in half length-wise and then basted, gathered, and pinned them to the wreath; others I left open and pinned them down the middle with gathers on both sides.

Summer Sun Wreath on Jan Made It

Since it was sooooo yellow I finished it off with about a half-yard of orange and yellow calico.  I folded it with the raw edges into the center and then folded it in half and draped it loosely in the center of the wreath and pinned it into place.

Summer Sun Wreath on Jan Made It

I found a fat quarter of batik, red with yellow flowers to make a sunspot on my sun.

Summer Sun Wreath on Jan Made It

I made the sunspot by pulling the corners of the fat quarter—wrong sides under—and stuck it to the wreath with a pin through the center, catching the four corners underneath. I formed it into a little puff, held it in place by hiding a few pins inside the folds.

Summer Sun Wreath on Jan Made It

That’s about all there is.

I’m brainstorming for my next wreath subject.  Something for September before I roll into Halloween.  Don’t know what kind of wreath I’ll make either. So far I’ve done fabric a few times and crochet.  Maybe something with paper?

My only criteria is to make it on this same foam wreath form, and to be able to use the parts for something else once the season has passed.

Any suggestions?

Jan

 

 

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Turkish Flat Weave Part II

I’ve figured out this Turkish Flat Weave beaded bracelet.

Turkish Flat Weave Beaded Bracelets on JanMadeIt

How ’bout them apples?

Turkish Flat Weave Bracelets on JanMadeIt

It was an easy process, but with the small beads all the same, my first attempts were a bit twisted. (See my previous post and you’ll know what I’m talking about.)

Turkish Flat Weave Blue and Pink bracelet on JanMadeIt

So I picked out larger beads and I threaded them on the cord in an A B pattern. I wanted to use that checkered wooden button so I picked the yellow and blue with the pink cord. I bought the cord in multi pack and the description was on the wrapper and not on the spools, so I’m not sure of the weight. Based on the .o5 inch blue cord below, it might be a .01 cord?

Turkish Flat Weave Pink and Blue Bracelets on JanMadeIt

Using the A B pattern of beads, it was very easy to keep my place. Every other “row” connected a blue bead, then a yellow bead. Easy peasy.

Turkish Flat Weave Red and Gold Bracelet on JanMadeIt

Then I had this red and gold button I wanted to use so I found some red and gold beads and decided on a black waxed cotton cord. Again, easy to keep my place.

Turkish Flat Weave White Bracelet on JanMadeIt

The white bracelet was made with nylon cord that’s used for Roman shades and other decorator window treatments. The bracelet is all white, but I created the A B pattern with white beads and clear beads. I used a vintage cuff link button to close this one.

Turkish Flat Weave Yellow and Lime Bracelet on JanMadeIt

Then I wanted to use the green stripey beads but I didn’t have enough of them to go all the way around so I added three different green beads to make that row long enough.

Turkish Flat Weave Yellow Lime Bracelet on JanMadeIt

I used a toggle clasp for this one. I’m not a fan of toggles. I’ve had a few fall off my wrist, but this one is small enough I think it will stay on.

Turkish Flat Weave pt05 Nylon Cord 1 on JanMadeIt

Then I wanted to play with making a wider bracelet so I started with larger cord. This is .05 inch nylon cord. I bought this spool on clearance awhile back intending to crochet a little purse with it, but that has yet to happen.

Turkish Flat Weave Pt05 Nylon Cord 2 on JanMadeIt

I had a tube of 2mm multi-colored blue Czech beads and I sorted them into a pattern that I liked. I also changed the single crochet stitch to a half-double crochet.

Turkish Flat Weave Turquoise Bracelet on JanMadeIt

The pattern has two beads on one side and one bead on the other. And look how well that flower button matches.

Turkish Flat Weave Turquoise and Pink Bracelets on JanMadeIt

Then I got brave enough to try something without the A B pattern thing going on and I made the pink one.

Turkish Flat Weave Pink 2 on JanMadeIt

I wasn’t bold enough to use all the same beads, but I used pairs of random pinks and purples. I also downsized to a Size F crochet hook.

Turkish Flat Weave Pink Bracelet on JanMadeIt

And then I found a teeny tiny pink button to use as a clasp. I put a single pink bead on top.

Turkish Flat Weave BlackGlass 2 on JanMadeIt

Then while sorting my beads to put them away I found a strand of black and brown glass beads I had to use. I matched them with simple round glass beads and used the 1mm rattail cord.

Turkish Flat Weave BlackGlass 1 on JanMadeIt

I stuck with the smaller hook (F) and kept my stitches tight.  And look at that cool chevron pattern that emerged.  It had been there all along but with the smaller cord and looser stitches it wasn’t obvious in the other bracelets.

Now I’m ready to make over the first two bracelets I made all twisty. They’re in a very special place and as soon as I can remember where that is, I’ll get right on it.

I have some beads I really want to use but the bead hole is very small.  I can use a reamer to smooth out holes that are a bit tight, but some are out of the questions. Does anyone know if I could drill out a bigger hole? I think I have a set of teeny tiny drill bits. It probably depends on the type of material the bead is made of. Any advice?

I might use two strands of cord. String the beads on a skinny little cord and align it with the larger cord I want to use. Then I’ll crochet them together with the beads on the smaller cord that’s practically invisible while the bracelet is made out of the larger more visible cord.

If you’re interested in doing this here’s the video tutorial where I found it. Her bracelets are much smaller and tidier than mine, but I’m still learning.  My goal was to make a beaded bracelet and I achieved that. I’m not very good at following instructions.

 

Oh, I couldn’t find C-Lon cord.  Not at JoAnn’s or Michael’s, which are my two options. I used cord I have on hand and picked out some other options. I have some bamboo I want to use, but it’s pretty thick.  I’ll have to find beads with large holes for that one, or use the double strand technique I mentioned.

Anyhoo.

If you make some of these (it’s addictive!  Like crafters need another addiction!) I’d love to see what you come up with and how you did it. It’s fast and simple once you pick out your beads.  I can make one in about a half-hour and then I have to decide on what kind of clasp I want.

I’ve shown you mine, now you show me yours!

Jan

 

 

 

 

 

Putting a Patch Pocket on Pajama Pants

Found a bargain on pajama pants last week, and I needed some new ones.  On clearance for $8, bright pink and peach plaid.  If you’ve been to Old Navy you’ve probably seen them. They had racks full of them!  No wonder they were clearanced.

Love em!  But they have no pockets, and I need a pocket. I’m addicted to lip balm and need a pocket to keep it in, even in my pajama pants!

No way I could match the plaid, but I have a good stack of pinks and peachy corals, so I found something to match.

I had some little squares leftover from a quilt in progress and thought they were about the right size so I put right sides together,

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

and made a little patch out of a plaid and this funky polka dot.

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

I turned it right side out, pressed it and top stitched around the edges of this little square, soon to be pocket.

Now if you’ve followed pattern instructions for putting on a pocket you’ve probably been instructed to cut one pocket and then press back a seam allowance pin it like crazy and try to stitch all those raw edges underneath.

That’s nonsense!

I don’t have the patience to do it that way, so I cut out two pocket pieces. Make a tiny pillow out of them. Press it flat and then stitch it on.

Voila! A pocket. And none of the frustration of lots of pins, and keeping that seam allowance hidden underneath. Ugh! This way is so much easier!

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

I was thinking of those little pocket watch pockets in Levis…. So I thought this would be just right.

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

Wrong!

I thought they were “about the same size” and I was right. the pocket and my lip gloss are the same size, which means the pocket is too small.

Maybe it I turn it on an angle.

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

Close enough.

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

The plaid made it easy to eyeball it so I pinned it and stitched it.

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

The little flap is just a smidge off,  but you might not have noticed it if I hadn’t told you.

But this pocket is very tiny.  What if I need a tissue? Or need to have my phone handy?

I guess I’ll make another pocket.

PajamaPant Pocket 11

It pays to have an extensive stash where I can just pull things out at the drop of a hat.

I assembled the pockets (I decided to make two while I was at it) and stitched up my miniature pillows.

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

Then I added a cuff on the top.

Now if I’d planned ahead I would have stitched the band on the top first, and then made the little pillow and applied it. But I wasn’t planning ahead so I went the long way around the mulberry bush.

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

And I stitched them on, guessing on the placement and aligning them with the plaid. I coulda tried the pants on and marked the pocket placement, but where’s the fun in that? I am quite experienced with the seam ripper if things don’t work out.

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

The opening is at the top and the bottom is sealed so I think that’s a win.

But it’s kind of boring. So back to the stash. This time digging through ribbon and trims.

How about some little pink ball fringe?

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

You won’t find ball fringe like this at any fabric store. I’ve been schlepping this around for a couple of decades.

Decades! I promise you.

They’re smaller than you’ll find today, and not as fuzzy.  And I have about a yard. Had about a yard. Now, after trimming two pockets, I have about two feet of it left.

I stitched it on by hand  so it will be easy to remove if I change my mind.

Pajama Pant Pockets on JanMadeIt

If I’d been planning to use this all along, I would have machine stitched them into that seam, but this works too.

What’s with all this planning ahead?

I have another pair of pants that need pockets. They’re white twill, and soooo comfortable, but the pockets will have to be set in the side seams. It will take less than a quarter yard of white muslin. I have some of that in my stash too.  I’ll do that and show you how I pull it off.

Have you had to add pockets or otherwise make amendments to a ready made garment? Was it easy? Did it work how you wanted? Did you wing it, or plan ahead? I’d love to hear how you pulled it off.

Jan

 

 

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A Bird Collar for Sundance

Sundance is my extremely huge long-haired tabby Maine-coonish sort of cat. And one of Sundance’s hobbies is to stalk and kill birds.

This is not OK.

Sundance on JanMadeIt

I wrote about it in my Bad Cat post over on Cottonmouth Creek, my photography blog.

Sundance's Bird Collar on JanMadeIt

My solution, and it works!, has been this big, bright fluffy collar. I had something like this in mind and when I googled “how to keep cats from killing birds” I found a Birdbesafe collar cover that works on the same premise.

Birds can see bright colors and this bright mane gives birds a chance to fly to safety when the cat is ready to pounce. I can’t guarantee it will work all the time with every cat, but Sundance doesn’t kill birds when he’s wearing this collar. He did, however, get a snake.  Ick.

Sundance's Bird Collar on JanMadeIt

Just in case my cat isn’t the only one out there that kills birds, I thought I’d show you how easy it is to make.

You’ll need elastic, some jingle bells, and a piece of fabric. Use bright scraps if you have them or if you need to buy some, 1/4 yard will do. Use woven cotton fabric for best results.

Sundance's Bird Collar on JanMadeIt

The quarter yard will be nine inches wide. Cut that piece into strips no wider than one inch. I used pinking shears but you can cut a straight edge if that’s all you have. Fabric with a tight weave will ravel less.

I matched the elastic to the length of his current collar and found ten inches is the length I need. Overlap the elastic about a half-inch and sew the ends together. You can stitch it by hand, or sew it on the machine.

Sundance's Bird Collar on JanMadeIt

Fold the fabric strips in half and loop them over the elastic and pull tight. Cram as many strips on the elastic as you can.

Then with a skinny strip of fabric, a shoe lace, or fishing line, string some jingle bells together in a loose clump and tie them to the collar and slip it on your cat.

Sundance's Bird Collar on JanMadeIt

I know some cats take to collars about as well as cats take to water, but fortunately Sundance doesn’t mind. The elastic is loose enough that he can slip his head out if it gets caught.

Montage was a white calico I had years ago. Within a few hours she would get out of any collar I put on her.  This wouldn’t have worked on her, but then she didn’t catch birds either.

After a few months the first collar I put on Sundance got pretty dingy and limp.  Before I could spruce it up or make a replacement a dead bird showed up on the patio. 😦

Sundance 6

Now I make a point to have a replacement handy.  I untied the strips on the first collar and put them in a lingerie bag and washed them. I have them to use on future collars. I used yellow because it was handy, and then I read that red and yellow are the colors most visible to birds. I’m going to add some red and neon green to the next collar I make.

I know, the best thing would be to keep the cat indoors, but that is not possible right now. Fortunately there’s a big back yard and Sundance has Zeus, the Chihuahua and Radley, the Papillon  to hang with.

Jan

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